Self-Interest or Selflessness

Thoughts on Leadership

God has created each of us for greatness. Not necessarily a greatness that can be seen with the naked eye but one that is visible to the God who sees all things.

We have, over the last several years, witnessed a phenomenon in the Christian world – the rise of the “celebrity pastor.” In his article, The Evangelical Industrial Complex and the Rise of Celebrity Pastors.[i] Skye Jethani argues that the “market-driven cycle of megachurches, conferences, and publishers results in an echo chamber where the same voices, espousing the same values, create an atmosphere where ministry success becomes equated with audience aggregation.”  As pastors gain more celebrity, it is not uncommon for them to become more and more isolated from their congregations. We know of many churches where it is almost impossible for a church member to have a conversation let alone a relationship with their pastor. As Bob Hyatt blogged “It should not be easier for CNN to get in touch with a pastor than people in his/her own congregation.”[ii]

It’s my contention that this same sort of process often takes place on a smaller scale between the pastor of a small to medium sized church and his congregation. Because we are created for greatness, there is something inside us that seeks affirmation of that greatness in the wrong place – the eyes of man instead of the eyes of God. Like those pastors whose celebrity is more wide spread, we all must check ourselves to see that our actions are not motivated by a desire for notoriety, influence, or some other sort of personal prestige. We can feed these desires when we position ourselves in the church in ways that make us indispensible. Sometimes we’re looking for notoriety, influence, or prestige in the eyes of God by trying to produce something that will make Him proud. On the surface, this seems logical but it causes our own performance and ego to get caught up with the church in an unhealthy way.

One of the keys to leading your church to greater fruitfulness is to set your own agenda aside. Make it less about what you want to see happen and more about what you see God doing in and through others. In this way, your agenda moves from being about accomplishing some predetermined goal and more about releasing others to follow the path to fruitfulness God has ordained for them.

In recent blogs, I have already said much about Jesus’ admonition that “whoever wishes to become great among you shall be your servant.” (Matthew 20:26) Servant leadership is a description we all hope would describe us but we don’t often take time to consider what it really means. Jesus is talking about us becoming slaves of others. Does this mean that we should put ourselves in position to be dominated by those we are supposed to lead? I don’t think so. But it certainly doesn’t mean we should expect others to serve us or our agendas. To be a servant leader, we must put the best interest of those we serve ahead of our own. We must seek to draw out their giftedness and help them enter into their full potential. This requires supernatural wisdom and a firm belief that God is able and willing to work in the hearts of His people. Servant leaders will find themselves pleading with God to fill the hearts and minds of His followers with love, patience, kindness, wisdom, etc. Servant leaders will listen to the dreams and aspirations of those they lead and help them to take steps toward realizing them.

One of the biggest hurdles for the servant leader to clear is the reluctance of Christians to believe it’s possible for them to live as fruitful servants of God.  Ephesians 4:11,12 says,

And He gave some as apostles, and some as prophets, and some as evangelists, and some as pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ.

Notice that the word “work” is singular. I think this hints at the idea that a major step in the process of equipping followers of Christ is helping them come to a place where they are willing to set aside their own will for the will of God. Just as we are saying that leaders need to move from selfishness to selflessness, be believe every believer who wishes to follow Christ must do the same. The apostle Paul agrees,

Therefore I urge you, brethren, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living and holy sacrifice, acceptable to God, which is your spiritual service of worship. And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect.  (Romans 12:1-2)

For our churches to thrive, we must promote a culture that is constantly reinforcing these truths and expecting nothing less than full surrender to the cause of Christ. As you and those you lead begin to act on these truths you will find that God will meet you in very personal and intimate ways and that the transformation Paul spoke of will become a reality in your experience.

From me to you…



[i] http://www.skyejethani.com/the-evangelical-industrial-complex-the-rise-of-celebrity-pastors/1166/

[ii] http://www.outofur.com/archives/2012/02/the_dangerous_p_3.html#more

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